Constant Acceleration

Written by Jerry Ratzlaff on . Posted in Classical Mechanics

Constant Acceleration

Constant acceleration ( \(a_c\) ) of an object is the constant rate in a straight line at which the velocity changes with respect to time.  These formulas can not be used if acceleration is not constant.

Constant Acceleration Formula

\(\large{  v_f = v_i \;+\; a_c t   }\)         

\(\large{ v_f ^2 =  v_i ^2  \;+\;  2a_c s   }\)

\(\large{ s =  \frac { 1 } { 2 }   \left( v_f  \;+ \; v_i \right)  t  }\)         

\(\large{ s =  v_i t \;+\;  \frac { 1 } { 2 } a_c t^2  }\)         

\(\large{ s =  v_f t \;-\;  \frac { 1 } { 2 } a_c t^2  }\)         

Where:

\(\large{ a_c }\) = constant acceleration

\(\large{ s }\) = displacement

\(\large{ t }\) = time

\(\large{ v_f }\) = final velocity

\(\large{ v_i }\) = initial velocity

 

Tags: Equations for Acceleration